Larry J Foster - a top 1% photographer

Award Winning Architectural Photographer

Master Photographer, PPA Certified

405.321.1972 -





Challenges and Transformations


Your projects deserve a top 1% photographer

There are 7,594 photographers in the state
Less than 50 of those are certified by the Professional Photographers of America
Only 25 of those have achieved the status of Master Photographer

Larry J Foster

"Larry made it clear his goal was to make our work look its very best. Not only did he get exactly the shots I wanted under challenging circumstances, but he surprised me with a few great images and angles I had not visualized."
-Ryan Eshelman, GSB inc
Professional Since 1989
I learned photography in the days of film with a 4x5 view camera. Yes, I still have one. That was a time when you had to get right in the camera - there was no "fix it in Photoshop". Every time you pressed the shutter it cost $5. Accuracy was imperative.

Technology has changed the photography industry and has opened up new techniques that I have incorporated into my services. But regardless how sophisticated cameras and computers get, it all starts with getting it "right" in the camera. On every assignment, I draw on those 20-plus years of experience.
PPA Certified
Certification is a two step process. First, one must pass a written test on the technical aspects of photography. (ie: If you have light at 5 feet from the subject and move the light to 10 feet, what is the change in f-stops?) Second, one must submit a collection of work that must be approved by a jury of peers as being professional. Photographers must be recertified every three years.
Master Photographer
The Master Degree is one of the highest achievement awards given by the Professional Photographers of America. It is earned by a combination of contributions to the professional photographer industry (articles and presentations) and by excellence in image competition. The Master Photographer degree is the sign of a top tier photographer.
It is about your design
But in the end, it is all about your design. It is what you do. Just setting a camera up and taking a picture does not capture your design. It takes lighting to bring out curves and lines that you drew into this. It takes areas of light and dark to lead the viewer's eye through the image much like you control the experience of the visitor in the space. When I photograph a project, I am always looking to bring out the details of your design.